Preface

Since that time, the series has been considerably augmented by the release of ninety additional specimens of thirty-eight different types.

It was originally intended some years ago merely to provide a companion volume to that already published, and thereby make available facts and figures pertaining to the subsequently issued pieces.

In view of the fact that the issue of Mr. Wood’s monograph became exhausted, it was deemed advisable to prepare a single volume covering the entire series, thereby bringing to the previous publication additional material which had become available since 1922, as well as a careful emendation of the text.

From the columbian issue of 1892 to the Grant coinages of 1922, the present text is still substantially as it originally appeared under the name of Howland Wood.

Every endeavour has been made to make this volume useful as a reference book to the collectors and numismatics; and it is hoped that the supplementary material will prove helpful. Corrections and additional facts will be warmly welcomed by the author.

So many persons have contributed to the preparation of this work, that it would be difficult to name them all. I wish to express my indebtedness, however, to Miss M. M. O’Reily, of the Treasury Department, to Mr. John R Sinnock, of the Bureau of the Mint, as well as to Messrs. C. F. Dunn of Lexington, Ky., L. W, Hoffecker of El Paso, Texas, Thomas O. Mabbott of New York City, Henry Weil of the Medallic Art Company of the New York City, and to Farran Zerbe of New York City.

I wish also to express my appreciation to the staff of the American Numismatic Society, in particular to Mr. Sydney P. Noe, Curator and Secretary, and to Mr. Sawyer McA. Mosser, Librarian, who have placed every facility at my disposal and have been most generous of their time and assistance.

I am under especially great obligation to the late Howland Wood, Curator of the American Numismatic Society, at whose suggestion the preparation for publication of the commemorative issues since the year 1922 was begun, and whose assistance and wide practical numismatic experience made this work immeasurably better throughout. Without his guidance and cooperation, its value would have been considerably less.

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